Tag: 30 Days Of Looking Down

  • 30 Days Of Looking Down #30

    30 Days Of Looking Down #30

    Phan Thảo Nguyên is obsessed with literary novels; she utilizes this obsession as a vehicle to examine history in her art. If history is conventionally described as a linear chronicle in books, Thảo Nguyên’s artworks break this linear form of time. They subtly suggest ‘alternative ways that the actual world might have been’ (Davies, David, […]

  • 30 Days Of Looking Down #29

    30 Days Of Looking Down #29

    Phan Thảo Nguyên is obsessed with literary novels; she utilizes this obsession as a vehicle to examine history in her art. If history is conventionally described as a linear chronicle in books, Thảo Nguyên’s artworks break this linear form of time. They subtly suggest ‘alternative ways that the actual world might have been’ (Davies, David, […]

  • 30 Days Of Looking Down #28

    30 Days Of Looking Down #28

    Phan Thảo Nguyên is obsessed with literary novels; she utilizes this obsession as a vehicle to examine history in her art. If history is conventionally described as a linear chronicle in books, Thảo Nguyên’s artworks break this linear form of time. They subtly suggest ‘alternative ways that the actual world might have been’ (Davies, David, […]

  • 30 Days Of Looking Down #27

    30 Days Of Looking Down #27

    Phan Thảo Nguyên is obsessed with literary novels; she utilizes this obsession as a vehicle to examine history in her art. If history is conventionally described as a linear chronicle in books, Thảo Nguyên’s artworks break this linear form of time. They subtly suggest ‘alternative ways that the actual world might have been’ (Davies, David, […]

  • 30 Days Of Looking Down #26

    30 Days Of Looking Down #26

    Phan Thảo Nguyên is obsessed with literary novels; she utilizes this obsession as a vehicle to examine history in her art. If history is conventionally described as a linear chronicle in books, Thảo Nguyên’s artworks break this linear form of time. They subtly suggest ‘alternative ways that the actual world might have been’ (Davies, David, […]

  • 30 Days Of Looking Down #23

    30 Days Of Looking Down #23

    Phan Thảo Nguyên is obsessed with literary novels; she utilizes this obsession as a vehicle to examine history in her art. If history is conventionally described as a linear chronicle in books, Thảo Nguyên’s artworks break this linear form of time. They subtly suggest ‘alternative ways that the actual world might have been’ (Davies, David, […]

  • 30 Days Of Looking Down #22

    30 Days Of Looking Down #22

    Phan Thảo Nguyên is obsessed with literary novels; she utilizes this obsession as a vehicle to examine history in her art. If history is conventionally described as a linear chronicle in books, Thảo Nguyên’s artworks break this linear form of time. They subtly suggest ‘alternative ways that the actual world might have been’ (Davies, David, […]

  • 30 Days Of Looking Down #15

    30 Days Of Looking Down #15

    Phan Thảo Nguyên is obsessed with literary novels; she utilizes this obsession as a vehicle to examine history in her art. If history is conventionally described as a linear chronicle in books, Thảo Nguyên’s artworks break this linear form of time. They subtly suggest ‘alternative ways that the actual world might have been’ (Davies, David, […]

  • 30 Days Of Looking Down #11

    30 Days Of Looking Down #11

    Phan Thảo Nguyên is obsessed with literary novels; she utilizes this obsession as a vehicle to examine history in her art. If history is conventionally described as a linear chronicle in books, Thảo Nguyên’s artworks break this linear form of time. They subtly suggest ‘alternative ways that the actual world might have been’ (Davies, David, […]

  • 30 Days Of Looking Down #10

    30 Days Of Looking Down #10

    Phan Thảo Nguyên is obsessed with literary novels; she utilizes this obsession as a vehicle to examine history in her art. If history is conventionally described as a linear chronicle in books, Thảo Nguyên’s artworks break this linear form of time. They subtly suggest ‘alternative ways that the actual world might have been’ (Davies, David, […]